Insight

Career Talk

/ 2 weeks ago /

 Article by Jem Collins

What Types of Property Jobs Are There For Graduates?

So, you’ve decided you want to work in property. But, bar becoming a professional at Minecraft (don’t let your parent’s laugh at your dreams, it can work) what kind of stuff should you be on the lookout for?

Property is a huge industry here in the UK – construction alone is worth more than £110 million a year and contributes some 7 percent of GDP. So, in short, there’s a lot of different types of jobs out there. Here’s our run through of a few options you might want to consider.

Surveyor

This in itself is actually a pretty wide term – there are a huge range of roles which all fall under the title of surveyor, a bit like the huge range of time-sucking cat videos you can find on TikTok

As a surveyor you could be working on new or existing buildings, checking that regulations are met, assessing the viability of developments, negotiating rents, buying or selling on behalf of a client, or estimating the time and labour involved in a job. 

Yep, we told you it was a long list, and that isn’t even the half of it.

In general, though, a degree accredited by the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors (RISC) is a good starting point, and you can expect a starting salary of £26-30,000pa, as well as the licence to leave your desk behind on a regular basis.

If you’re interested in surveying as a career, we’d also suggest taking a deep dive into all of the different options out there. The more you’re able to explain why a specific tract fits your experience, the more more likely you’ll be able to snag the gig.

Property Management

We’ll get this out of the way early on – property management isn’t just about the bougie housing developments you see springing up in old industrial areas. As a graduate property manager you could be working on anything from private residences to schools, leisure centres, or historical buildings.

The clue is very much in the name here – as a property manager you’ll be responsible for making sure the building runs smoothly and safely at all times. Depending on the area you work in, this could be liaising with tenants, scheduling repairs, or organising valuations or surveys.

As a grad you can typically expect anything from £20-27,000pa for your first role, which will only go up as you gain more experience. Climb your way up to a senior manager level and you’ll happily be netting more than £60,000pa.

Estate Agent

Alright, so don’t be put off by whatever dealings you’ve had with student lettings agents so far – a career as an estate agent can be a solid career choice with plenty of opportunities to progress.

While estate agent roles don’t necessarily require a degree, several bigger firms will advertise for graduate trainee roles, and you’ll often be able to use the experience you’ve gained from your studies as an added bonus in roles that don’t require it.

Generally, the starting salary for an estate agent is anywhere between £14-20,000pa depending on where in the country you’re based. However, it’s worth remembering that estate agency is an industry based on commissions – so the more you sell, the more you’ll earn.

Town Planner

Yep, this one is where the Minecraft experience really kicks in. As a planner you’ll be the person who oversees the development or redevelopment of towns, cities, and villages. Yes, we know, some of these job titles don’t quite fit the descriptions, but hey, we didn’t make up the names.

You’ll be the person who tries to juggle the various needs of the population (for example, housing, industry, farming, and transport) while also thinking about how your plans might affect the environment or contribute to climate change.

In general, as an assistant planner you’ll probably be looking at a starting salary of £18-25,000pa, but this can rise to more than £55,000pa if you continue on to become a chief planner.

Architect

If creating buildings sounds like your cup of builders tea, then you’ll need to take that into account as soon as you start thinking about your degree options, as generally you’ll need to complete a recognised architecture degree in order to get your first gig.

In addition, you’ll need to register with the Architects Registration Board (ARB). They’re basically the guys who regulate the whole of the UK’s architecture industry, and you need to be on their books to actually work as an architect. 

Paperwork aside though, architecture is a great career if you’re interested in the design aspects of property and want a job that also allows you to get out and about. Starting out you can generally expect a salary of £15-22,000pa, but as a fully qualified architect that rises to anywhere between £32-45,000pa.

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